Working from home? Things to consider.

There are two elements of working from home:

1) working under flexi rules for the company that employs you, or

2) running your own business from home.

If the former, please agree with your boss what they are going to cover expense wise, and how they will agree the hours you work. You should also seek a bonus, since you are reducing company costs.

If you are renting, then you are obliged to inform the landlord and if you have clients visit, please have your insurance revised to cover that.

If you are buying then please inform the mortgage company. Insurance has to be amended too.

Such as contents and also public liability cover.

In most cases, flexi working does not see clients visiting.

So onto number two and running your own business from home – link to follow.

2) running you own business from home.

All the above apply and more so – I would seriously discourage having people visit – suggesting a coffee shop or hotel as better, especially for people who work alone. You really do not want a nutter in your house or flat.

Create a routine in your life and build in social, me time, otherwise you will become stale and very quickly. In an office there is interaction, on your own at home, there is not.

A daily To Do list done the night before is now vital. Too many distractions otherwise.

Go out for a coffee/tea or a walk at some point – I have made friends with all the independent businesses locally and often pop in for a chat.
Also look for support such as here in this group, where you can share your success and seek guidance.

Keep an accurate record of all expenses – they are tax deductible.
Don’t forget energy a percentage of your council tax charge.

If your profit is less than £10,000 then claim working tax credits – these apply to the self employed too.

Create a phone line for business use only – it is 100% tax deductible. My link will explain more. And of course good broadband, go fiber if your area supports it, especially if you have family too.

Check you can use your home address for correspondence purposes. If not, seek an alternative, such as MailBoxes Etc. or your accountant.

Don’t be afraid to seek help and see what grants may be available as a start up or small business.

Networking groups have already been mentioned – there are also others less formal that meet as a coffee morning and some Chambers of Commerce run lunch time events, plus offer training in skills you need.

That covers most of it and my link is here:

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4.5 million British adults have less than £10 spare cash each month

One in 11 people, or 4.5 million British adults, have less than £10 a month left over once they have paid their essential bills, new research from thinkmoney has found.

With many households struggling to make ends meet, the findings from budgeting account provider thinkmoney reveal the worryingly small amounts of disposable income people have left once they’ve met all their financial commitments.

Of the 2,149 people polled, one in four said they had less than £50 a month to s…pend after bills.

Across the UK, the average monthly disposable income was £224.50. However, there was a wide gender difference with men reporting having disposable incomes averaging £272.50, almost twice as much as women (£190.20).

Young people reported having the least disposable income, with 18-24 year-olds averaging £174.20 – some 22% below the overall UK average. Almost one in three people in this age group have less than £50 a month to spend after bills.

By contrast, the wealthiest in terms of post-bills spending money are people over 65, with an average of £269.50 a month available to spend.

The amount of disposable income also varies depending on where people live. It is highest in London, at an average of £261, and the South East, at £244. People in the North East and Wales have the lowest disposable incomes, at £199 and £181 respectively.

Worryingly, one in six people questioned in Wales said they had less than £10 a month to spend after bills.

“It’s stressful not knowing if you will have enough money to pay the bills and afford added extras each month,” said Ian Williams, director of communications at thinkmoney.

If you would like to know how to create additional income streams, please visit http://www.future-biz.co.uk and click contact us to request your free money making report?

Why does networking work?

helping you make or save money or bothThis a question that crops up time and again – I simply enjoy the buzz of a successful breakfast. Yes, I accept networking for some on a cold winter morning is not fun, but you are in a warm and supportive environment, and cold is only felt, when you wear the wrong sort of clothes.

Also if morning is not your thing, then there are lunch time and evening groups – just accept though, numbers will be smaller.

More importantly, I was discussing the merits of networking with a colleague earlier this week, and I explained that an average group with BNI see 200 visitors a year through the door. Not all will join, but that is 200 companies looking to grow their business. Maybe, you have something to offer them through a joint venture? Or a product or service to make their life easier?

So no gate keepers, no voice mail, just you speaking direct to a decision maker.

How much effort do you have to put in to find 200 opportunities for new business? With a networking group it is presented to you, more or less on a plate, plus of course existing members will refer you too. Again no gate keepers, qualified leads and a warm welcome.

I am known as a networking tart – it is a great tag, and a reflection on the fact, I deliver again and again for members around the table, and they in turn deliver for me.

A real win-win.

With over 15 years of networking for my own business, I know it works, so why not give it a go at a number of different groups, and find one you like, then commit, and create a lasting stream of new leads.

Telecom plus Plc delivers again through photosynthesis

One of my friends spotted this and thought I would share it too:

This has to be one of the best reports I’ve read on the company. Even a non finance guy like me can understand it! I love the quote “Telecom Plus isn’t a normal utility, it’s not even a normal growth company, its more like a robust house plant, growing through photosynthesis and the odd sprinkling of water. And neither the sun nor rain get switched off”.

http://www.sharesmagazine.co.uk/news/telecom-plus-both-weird-and-wonderful

For people looking to create new income streams, then the following is of vital interest, since it shows the potential profit for team members, which are called Independent Distributors.

“Over half of new sign-ups (55%) come in as Gold members, those taking at least four of its five services (gas, electricity, home phone, broadband, mobile), and when it gets them through the door, they tend to stick like flies to paper, churn down to just 1.2%.

What this means is that average revenue per user, or ARPU, rises on a seemingly unstoppable tide, jumping 14.5% to £1,363 last year. That’s nearly 200% up in 10 years and makes the £190 ARPU in its first year back in 1999 look laughably minuscule.”

I can write from direct knowledge, since I have been involved in the business since 1997, and the ARPU referred to above is so on the money, if you pardon the expression. :o)

And the future is looking brighter and brighter, as more people hear about the award winning services and customer care.

To find out about becoming involved in the business, this link will tell you more: www.future-biz.co.uk

If you are in London on Monday 3rd June, then there is a massive presentation taking place in the evening – details here:

http://super-cop-london.eventbrite.co.uk

Update: Tuesday 4th June – what an extraordinary evening. Over 500 people came along to the event last night. Clive Leach and Robin Brooks were in stunning form as they presented the business to the assembled numbers. It truly was standing room only and the attendees were educated and entertained by two stars in our successful business.

O2 closes call centres

An announcement that appeared in the Daily Telegraph this week shows the pressure the main mobile networks are under financially as they go the outsourcing route again to India and South Africa.

Unfortunately, it is simply the user that will suffer in the long run as call waiting times increase.

More here:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/mediatechnologyandtelecoms/telecoms/10087909/Capita-plans-to-close-O2-call-centres-and-cut-thousands-of-jobs.html

The article also says:

Meanwhile, a Capita call centre in Cape Town that already handles a small proportion of O2 customer service will be expanded from 200 staff currently to 660 in 2015. A Capita centre in India offering support via web chat will also be expanded as part of plans to discourage customer calls, known as “contact deflection”.

Overall, it is planned that the staff of more than 5,800 worldwide currently serving O2 customers will be cut to fewer than 3,000 at the end of Capita’s contract in 10 years.

That is quite a frightening cut back in service levels.

Whereas Telecom Plus here in the UK is more than doubling is HO footprint and customer care staff to cope with ever more increasing demand for its range of award winning services.

This growth is reflected in the record share price delivered this past week as The City continues to sound its approval. http://www.sharesmagazine.co.uk/news/telecom-plus-both-weird-and-wonderful

The range of services on offer to both the business user and home user continues to deliver value for money. More here: www.go-fast.co.uk

A further comment can be found here on the impact of the year end results:

http://wp.me/pae1W-8L

How do you describe and determine your ideal client?

This is a vital question in my view, when determining your goals.

Part of any business plan, a marketing plan must be created, and within should be an ideal client description.

Why?

Quite simply, if you do not know your ideal client and where they are found, how can you market your business to attract them.

On LinkedIn, there has been quite debate about business failure, and everyone has misunderstood that the basic business building block has been ignored.

So, how do you describe and determine your ideal client?

What factors should you include in such a description?

This will be an interesting debate, since, I am presently in the process of creating new ones for my business.

Ideal Client?

It is a question that comes  up again and again ………

Should this be fixed, or flexible depending on the financial climate?

Or perhaps you seek a niche and stick with that, come what may?

Decisions, decisions.

So what has been decided is that there will be a number of different scenarios; all created as A4 documents, maybe a PDF. These will be available for download soon to satisfy a demand, I am not convinced is there – we shall see.

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